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Tag Archives: nutrition

  • Dr. Mark Hyman's New Book: "Food. What the Heck Should I Eat?"

    by Village Green Admin | January 8, 2018

    This blog was written by Dr. Mark Hyman about his new book, Food. What the Heck Should I Eat? (Article reposted with permission from Dr. Mark Hyman.)
    * * *

    food-what-the-heck-should-i-eatEating healthy is more confusing than ever. I’ve been studying nutrition for 35 years and found that even experts are confused by the science. If the people we look to for nutritional guidance keep changing their views, no wonder the rest of us are so overwhelmed!

    You know what I’m talking about. One day eggs are unhealthy, then the next day they are a miracle food. One year the government tells us to eat bread, pasta, and other carbohydrates as the foundation of our diet, and the next it tells us to cut carbs. The US Dietary Guidelines told us 35 years ago that all our health problems were derived from eating fat and recommended we eat fat “only sparingly.” Over three decades later, they suddenly learned fat wasn’t so bad for us.

    Then you’ve got the dogmatists who believe you must adhere 100% to a particular plan to be lean and healthy, whether that plan be vegan, Paleo, vegetarian, Mediterranean, raw food, ketogenic, high-fat, low-fat or omnivore. Read more

  • Healthy Snacking in the Summer

    by Paula Gallagher | June 28, 2017

    healthy-snacksThe school year has wound down around here, and that means that routine goes out the window. My kids go from 3 healthy meals and 2 snacks per day to continuous grazing, thanks to a mostly unscheduled summer. The problem is that this lack of schedule tends to lend itself to higher fat, higher sugar and less nutritious diet because the snacks my kids gravitate toward tend to be granola bars and freezies! So, although the summer is more free-flowing, to encourage healthy snacking, I find it important to have tasty and filling snacks ready to go. I plan ahead and make big batches, and freeze them, where appropriate. Read more

  • 10 Foods That Can Increase or Decrease Life Expectancy

    by Paula Gallagher | March 22, 2017

    produce-departmentWe all know that a healthy diet can have a big impact on your overall well being, but a new study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) reveals which foods we need to eat more of and which foods we need to eat less of to decrease mortality from heart disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes.

    According to this study, poor diet is the cause of at least half of deaths from heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes. In 2012, about 700,000 Americans died from these diseases and diet was linked to nearly 319,000 of these deaths. This study suggests that changing Americans' dietary habits could have a significant impact on the risk of death from these diseases. Read more

  • March is National Nutrition Month: Put Your Best Fork Forward!

    by Paula Gallagher | March 1, 2017

    Best-Fork-Forward_VeggiesNational Nutrition Month® is a campaign started by The Academy of Dietetics and Nutrition to encourage people to eat better and be more active. This year’s theme, "Put Your Best Fork Forward," acts as a reminder that each bite counts and that making just small shifts in your food choices can make a big impact on your health.

    In honor of National Nutrition Month, over the next few weeks I will be posting articles that include tips for healthy meal planning on a budget, what to eat when you are always on the run, and so much more. I will also continue to post healthy and delicious recipes. Read more

  • How to Build a Healthy Pantry on a Budget

    by Paula Gallagher | October 24, 2016

    pantryHaving a well-stocked, healthy pantry can make the difference between making a quick and simple minestrone dinner or ordering a pizza. By the time it takes for the pizza to get to your door, you and your family could be sitting down to a warm, nutritious and hearty bowl of soup.

    Here are some tips for building a budget-friendly pantry full of superfoods.

    Beans and other legumes: Dried lentils cook up in less than 30 minutes and provide a great base for stews, soups, salads and curries. Canned beans are a quick protein to add to pastas and grains, as well as to blend into dips. Or, cook a large batch of dried beans and store in 2 cup portions in the freezer for up to 2 months.

    Whole grains: Adding fiber and B vitamins, whole grains can be a filling side to fish, chicken or tofu. Quick-cooking varieties include oats, quinoa, millet and amaranth. Longer-cooking grains such as brown rice can be cooked and frozen for up to 2 months – just defrost and add to your recipe for a quick weeknight meal. Read more

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